We count Carbs, not Calories

On any good low-carb/keto eating plan, this is the rule: we restrict carbohydrate grams, not calories! If you have a choice between eating a hundred -calorie pack of a high carb food and 400 calories of zero-carb steak, our eating plan says eat the steak.

Some detractors of our way-of-eating claim that Atkins, low-carb and keto only cause weight loss in people who also cut calories. From a scientific perspective, these people are wrong.

A scientific study by Kekwick and Pawan compared three 1000 calorie diets. One was mostly carbohydrates, one mostly protein and one mostly fat. If the common beliefs about calories were true, we would have expected all three groups to have the same outcomes.

But that is not what happened. The carbohydrate diet did not produce weight loss. The protein diet did, and the fat version had even better results.

This study shows that in the body, not all calories are treated in the same way. Which is a big ‘fail’ for the calorie theory.

But some people persist and try to mingle the two approaches. Which is likely to leave you hungry, malnourished and miserable.

Think about a typical ‘dieting’ day. You’re hungry, and you only have about 100 calories left. So you eat one of those 100 calorie packs of high-carb food, you get hungry again very shortly, and you have to hope a magic dose of willpower kicks in so you won’t eat again until morning.

The same situation on low-carb/keto: you are hungry, you’ve eaten all your carbs for the day— and so you have yourself a nice zero-carb steak. Maybe that’s 300 calories, maybe 400, but you don’t have to care about that. You don’t count calories, you count carbs. And the carbs are zero.

Many, many people have lost weight with low-carb eating more calories than one would dare to consume on a calorie-counting diet. Others do eat less on keto, but that’s because being in ketosis makes you unhungry.

So don’t believe it when they say low-carb only works when you are counting calories as well. The science backs up low-carb, and the idea that on low-carb you can actually eat food when you get hungry. It’s not a semi-starvation plan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.