Monthly Archives: June 2021

Dr. Jason Fung Could Cure Your Diabetes.

Maybe you have been told that if you have T2 diabetes, you are diabetic for life. But Dr. Jason Fung knows an easy way to cure diabetes: bariatric (weight-loss) surgery.


All current kinds of bariatric surgery have this effect, and they reverse the diabetes before significant amounts of weight are lost.


So— does Dr. Jason Fung recommend we all get in line for bariatric surgery? No. The surgeries all have lifelong side effects, and in addition, over time many bariatric surgery patients adapt, they gain the weight back, and the diabetes as well. So bariatric surgery is a big risk and a big expense for something that may not last.


Dr. Jason Fung says he has a better way. He recommends intermittent fasting (and low-carbohydrate eating plans) as a way to get the results of bariatric surgery without the risks and complications.


In my experience, fasting is not so hard when I am in a state of ketosis. Dr. Jason Fung, who seemed to have had some difficulty in teaching his patients how to eat low-carb, often had his patients go direct from their normal, high-carb diets into fasting. This is harder, but if you do a fast of several days, you will get into ketosis by the third day anyway.


When Dr. Fung’s patients first fasted, and then were encouraged to eat low-carb foods, they would feel better once they were in ketosis, and they continue to feel good when they ate the suggested low-carb foods. But when they feasted on bread or french fries or donuts during their eating period, they would be kicked out of ketosis and feel less well. Most probably learned what eating low-carb meant because eating the high-carb foods had a bad effect.
Dr. Fung found that his patients had good results— they got off their diabetes meds, they had better A1c results, even non-diabetic ones, and their diabetes complications got better.


Do you have to do fasting if you are diabetic and want to control your diabetes. Other doctors such as Atkins and Bernstein never recommended fasting— though neither seemed to have a great deal of trouble with patients who couldn’t learn what low-carb meant. Atkins and Bernstein even warned against ‘skipping meals.’
I remember when Jimmy Moore had a fasting podcast— he often asked his guests if they had ever spontaneously fasted while doing keto/low-carb. Many had. If you are in ketosis which relieves your hunger and gives you more energy, sometimes it doesn’t seem to be worth bothering to make a meal.


Dr. Jason Fung is a big believer in the benefits of fasting— it doesn’t cause your metabolism to slow down, the way low-calorie dieting does. And it’s a quick way to get into ketosis and to lower your blood sugars.


One unsung reason I like fasting is that it is cheap. Going low-carb/keto often means spending more on food. Food banks rarely carry anything the low-carber can eat, other than a stray can of tuna or Spam. Institutional foods— even in rehab centers/nursing homes full of diabetics— are high in carbs and low in everything else.
Years ago I figured out that the monthly Food Stamp funds people get was not enough for them to eat three meals a day. I quickly adopted intermittent fasting, at least in the mornings, to regulate my food expenses. When I did longer fasting, I really saved.


The down side of fasting is that you can’t do it forever. At some point you to eat food. In my own experience, I find that fasting might make me hungry, especially extended fasting. And since I’ve been so good doing fasting, I might feel I deserve a carb treat— which usually leads to more carbs in my case. 


Right now I’m trying to get back on track doing more fasting as a routine in my life. I’m trying to do the 30 hour fasting plan (Sample 2) from Dr. Jason Fung’s ‘The Diabetic Code.’ The advantage to this plan is that I get to eat something every day— I just skip certain meals. 

The Mediterranean Low-Carb ‘Diet.’

Among the many low-carb/keto books in my book hoard is ‘Conquer Diabetes & Prediabetes: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet’ by Steve Parker, MD.


The book seems to be self-published, and Parker is not, so far as I know, a well-known name in the low-carb community, so I would not recommend this book as your first or only book on low-carb/keto.


What I think it is good for is this: if you have been doing low-carb for a while and want to try something that’s still low-carb but feels different, or if you’ve been doing Atkins and your ignorant family and friends are nagging you to quit because they think Atkins will kill you, this may be something to try. Imagine telling those pushy family members ‘I’m on the Mediterranean diet’ and watching their objections go away.


Parker’s diet (he calls it a diet, sadly) has two phases. One he calls the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, which is similar to Atkins Induction— it is more strictly low-carb and can put your body into the healthy state of ketosis.


The other phase is less strict, and is called Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet. Like the Atkins levels, this phase adds a bit more carbs, and so may cause increases in blood sugar, and slowing or stopping of desired weight loss. 40-100 grams of carbs are allowed — though many of us can’t do such levels and still control our blood sugars. 


Some of the recommendations may not be too palatable to some of us. Using olive oil to cook eggs, in my own experience, results in eggs with an off taste I do not enjoy. I would rather cook eggs in coconut oil or butter, and have eggs with a better taste. I have to eat low-carb long-term, and so I prefer avoiding olive oil when that ruins the taste of a meal. (I use it when cooking my kebabs and my bun-free burgers, though, and couldn’t taste the difference.)


Both phases of the diet allow the use of 6-12 oz of wine daily. I was never a drinker, but a small amount of wine with my low-carb, ketogenic meal has a good bit of appeal to me. (Needless to say, problem drinkers should not try this.)


Some of the carbs Parker suggests adding back in the Low-Carb phase seem a bit impractical for some people. He recommends eating 1/3 of a medium apple or 1/3 of a banana. Which means there is 2/3s of that apple or banana still around, and if you like those fruits you might be tempted to eat the rest. Particularly since a cut-open apple or banana does not improve when you set it aside for the next day’s serving.


It also suggests 1/2 a slice of ordinary whole wheat bread or Ezekial 4:9 bread. This leaves another 1/2 slice lying around, plus you have a whole loaf of bread around somewhere. I find that when I resolve to eat only 1/2 a slice of bread, I eat the whole slice or perhaps two, and then my carb-cravings are triggered and I’m likely to eat a few more slices later on. Which is why I prefer to stick with low-carb bread (Aunt Millie’s Carb Smart, 1 net carb per slice) and to eat it only at the last meal of the day.


Parker also allows 3 Tablespoons (1/4 cup) of cooked brown rice. I own a rice cooker, and it just does not work to cook up such a small amount— so you will have a larger batch of cooked rice on hand. Will you be able to resist eating more? I can’t. And after triggering my carb cravings with the rice I’ll have plenty of cooked rice on hand to have a carb binge on. NOT a sustainable low-carb/keto practice.


Right now I’m pushing my low-carb/keto routine in the direction of the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet. If I go on to the higher carb levels of the second phase, it will probably be only one extra serving of the less problematic carbs, done on one or two days a week, and only on days when my morning blood sugar has been good.


My problem is that for the past few months I have had difficulty getting my desired low-carb food supplies due to vehicle problems. My friends, none low-carbers, offer to go buy me groceries, but none are willing to pick me up and drive me to the store. I had one dear friend bring me a load of things that included 5 or 6 loaves of ordinary white bread, loads of pasta, but very little of what I should be eating. And, with limited food in the house, I ate it.


Which brought my carb cravings roaring back, and when I could get to stores I found myself getting ‘treats’— and then lacking the energy to make myself proper low-carb meals, which lead to more ‘treats,’ and as a result my weight has gone up quite a bit.
SO— I need to get back on my keto/low-carbing life, and I’m using the Ketogenic Mediterranean eating plan to do it. Since it’s hard for me to get the salad veggies I need in my rural area, I’ve cleaned up my Victorio sprouter and started my sprouting seeds so I can have daily sprouted salads. I’m consulting Parker’s book for some fresh ideas on what to eat— I’ve already tried his Easy Tuna plus Pecans yesterday, replacing the nasty-and-sugared Miracle Whip with real mayonnaise (would have used avocado oil mayonnaise but can’t get it.)