Category Archives: Low-Carbohydrate Eating Plans

Learning how to get started on lowcarb/keto.

OK, you’ve decided to try lowcarb/keto to deal with some health problems or some weight you want to lose. If you are like most people, your biggest stumbling block will not be a lack of ‘willpower’ but a lack of information.


Diet product marketers love that lack of information. Big marketers use ignorance to sell vast numbers of products to deluded people— like those ‘keto’ pills that contain a tiny amount of MCT oil, and the claim is that if you take those pills, you can still eat loads of carbs and stay in ketosis. 


There are also the pathetic mini-marketers, many of whom seem to live in India, who spam social media groups on MeWe, Gab, and the anti-free-speech social medium with F and B in the name. They will sell you ‘keto’ meal plans and fast weight loss gimmicks and self-published ‘keto’ recipe books with non-functional recipes full of typos. OK, folks, real businessmen with a product to sell don’t spam online groups to get free advertising. 


How do you get real information? From actual books, most of which will be published by actual publishers. The best authors are doctors who have become known in the keto community. Some non-doctors like Jimmy Moore and Dana Carpender are useful as well.


The problem with getting your initial infomation on lowcarb/keto from podcasts, web sites, spammers, or self-published spam books is that anyone out there can make podcasts, web sites, spam posts in groups, and so on. They can put up wrong information if they want to, too. I remember encountering some one that had a book out about carnivore, who demanded that his followers in a social media group accept his theory that a carnivore having a hard time losing weight should cut the fat from his diet. I pointed out the Kekwick and Pawan study of 1957, but that person didn’t seem to think it applied as much as his own personal authority did.


I am not a medical doctor or a ‘diet’ guru or an experimental scientist. I’m just someone who has found out about lowcarb/keto and used it for blood sugar control and weight loss. Since I’m decently well-educated and have read loads of books about lowcarb and about diet and health in general, I’d really like to help others get correct information, too.
So— I’m starting a series on this blog. We are going to study the book ‘Doctor Atkins’ Diet Revolution’ and apply some of the things we learn to our lives. 


To participate, you will have to buy a copy of ‘Doctor Atkins’ Diet Revolution,’ which was published in 1972. You can get it as a mass-market paperback from Amazon or other online retailers, or you may be able to get a copy from a used book store if you have one where you live. I got my copy of the book from a thrift shop years ago. 


Dr. Atkins later wrote ‘Doctor Atkins New Diet Revolution’ in 1992. This book is a useful book, it advocates for the same eating plan, and I own a couple of copies of that book as well. But it’s not the exact text we are going to be talking about. Do consider the book an officially encouraged secondary textbook, however.


When you get your Atkins book, start out by reading it. If you are a big reader like me, you will dash through it the first time, and may need to read some of it over again to catch some important points. If you are not big on reading, if you don’t consider yourself good at reading, start at the beginning and read a chapter a day or a section a day until you get through. Read at your own pace. If you have the book on Kindle you can easily highlight anything that seems important or that you might want to read again later.


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Are you on board with joining us in this look at Atkins? Say so in a comment on this blog, then order the book, and read it when it arrives to get yourself basically oriented as to what Atkins and the lowcarb/ketogenic way are really all about. The next post in this blog series will come along in about a week.

The Fast-5 Diet by Bert W. Herring, MD #fasting

Among the many volumes in my low-carb and health library is ont called ‘The Fast-5 Diet and the Fast-5 Lifestyle,’ by Bert W. Herring, MD.


I first heard of Dr. Herring when I read ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting’ by Jimmy Moore and Dr. Jason Fung.


Dr. Herring’s approach is to have people slowly adjust their eating window— the time of day when they allow themselves to eat. Some people only don’t allow themselves to eat when they are sound asleep!


You figure out in which hours your eating window is currently open, and when it is closed. And then you start adjusting. If you snack constantly in the evening til 11 pm, you start ending the snacking at 10, then at 9.


Dr. Herring’s goal is to narrow your eating window to the hours of 5pm to 10pm. But he also says you will be eating one meal a day. Does it really take from 5 to 10 to eat your supper? 


Dr. Herring also does not say one word about doing low-carb in your eating hours, and he seems big on cutting ‘calories.’ If you know about Kekwick and Pawan’s 1957 study, you know the ‘calorie is a calorie is a calorie’ slogan has been disproved some time ago.


If you want to add intermittent fasting to your life and have the choice between this book and Moore and Fung’s ‘The Complete Guide to Fasting,’ go with Moore & Fung. Much more informative book.


But if you or someone you know is just not at the point of doing low-carb but needs to get more control over weight or health issues such as blood sugar, the ‘Fast-5 Diet’ might be the right approach.


Personal note: I’ve been doing intermittent fasting every since the Moore/Fung book came out. Usually I do morning fasting. Sometimes I have allowed myself a bulletproof coffee, or lightly-bulletproof coffee in the morning.


After my health issues a few years ago, I did less fasting— I had to fast part of the time in the hospital, the rehab center, and ‘elsewhere’ to avoid meals that were mostly carbs.


But I’ve recovered now, and decided to get back on track with fasting. After a failed attempt with Dr. Jason Fung’s 30-hour fasting protocol, I went back to the no-breakfast plan. I usually close my eating window at 5 to 5:30 pm, since eating late raises my blood sugar the next morning. 


And I realized— if I eat my lunch at 12 noon and my supper just before 5, I have the same eating window Dr. Herring recommends. I just have two meals within it. Since they are low-carb meals, I think I can expect as good a result as the Fast-5 dieters.


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Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet vs Atkins Induction #keto #lowcarb

How does the Ketogenic Mediterranean ‘Diet’ by Steve Parker MD compare with Atkins Induction?
Atkins Induction allows 20 grams of net carbs per day. (Net carbs = total carbs – fiber.) The KMD allows 20-40 grams of carbs per day. If you do closer to th 40 than the 20, you may have problems getting into ketosis (check your Ketonix, test strips or blood ketone meter.)


KMD allows 14 oz. of vegetables a day (400 g.) Atkins Induction allows 2 cups of salad and 3/4 cup of cooked low-carb vegetables (probably 1 cup fresh.) I think this comes pretty much to the same amount. Two cups of salad is 4 net carbs if it’s lettuce, about 1 net carb if it’s alfalfa sprouts. 1 cup of green beans is about 5 net carbs. So, let’s say on both plans we may get around 9 net carbs from our veggies.


KMD allows 3 oz. of cheese, Original Atkins allowed 4 oz. and New Atkins made cheese a ‘free food.’ 1 oz, which is one slice of cheese, is a ‘trace’ of carbs for most cheeses and 2 g of Swiss cheese. So let’s say 3 net carbs for KMD and 4 or more for Atkins Induction.


KMD allows 1 oz of nuts-and-seeds daily. Atkins doesn’t allow nuts on Induction. 1 oz of pecans is 1 net carb, walnuts or macadamias are 2 net carbs, and peanuts are 3 net carbs. 


KMD allows 6-12 oz. of table wines, red or white, such as Burgundy, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Sauvignon blanc, Riesling, Pinot Grigio. These are all 1 gram of carb per oz, so this is an addition of 6-12 grams of carbs. (I only drink 2 oz to a glass and have the wine at my two meals.)


So— following the KMD may add as much as 15 grams of carbs from items not allowed in Atkins Induction. Now, among the carb-containing foods allowed on both, you may not be getting 20 full grams of carbs from just those items. I would advise keeping a food diary and checking up at least on the carb-containing foods you eat. If you are close to 20 grams even with the addition of a little nuts-and-seeds and a little wine, that is great.


If your net carb grams are creeping along toward the 40, check to see what you are doing too much of. I would cut back on the wine amount if you are doing the full 12 oz, rather than, say, cutting out one of the daily salads. 


I like the KMD as it is a nice change from doing Atkins at Induction or near-induction levels for years. I find I like having a bit of wine with my meals— when I finish my wine, I feel more like I’ve had a real meal and am finished. 


The KMD also insists that you have a daily serving of fish. Mine is mostly canned tuna, which I have for lunch prepared into one of two different recipes, one a low-carb ‘tuna casserole’ and the other a ‘tuna loaf.’ (I add my nut ration, in pecan or walnut pieces, into the tuna recipe.)


Sources: 

Parker, Steve, MD – Conquer Diabetes & Prediabetes: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet, 2011.Atkins, Robert C., MD — Dr Atkins Diet Revolution, 1972.Atkins, Robert C., MD and Gare, Fran – Dr Atkins New Diet Cookbook, 1994.
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The Mediterranean Low-Carb ‘Diet.’

Among the many low-carb/keto books in my book hoard is ‘Conquer Diabetes & Prediabetes: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet’ by Steve Parker, MD.


The book seems to be self-published, and Parker is not, so far as I know, a well-known name in the low-carb community, so I would not recommend this book as your first or only book on low-carb/keto.


What I think it is good for is this: if you have been doing low-carb for a while and want to try something that’s still low-carb but feels different, or if you’ve been doing Atkins and your ignorant family and friends are nagging you to quit because they think Atkins will kill you, this may be something to try. Imagine telling those pushy family members ‘I’m on the Mediterranean diet’ and watching their objections go away.


Parker’s diet (he calls it a diet, sadly) has two phases. One he calls the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, which is similar to Atkins Induction— it is more strictly low-carb and can put your body into the healthy state of ketosis.


The other phase is less strict, and is called Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet. Like the Atkins levels, this phase adds a bit more carbs, and so may cause increases in blood sugar, and slowing or stopping of desired weight loss. 40-100 grams of carbs are allowed — though many of us can’t do such levels and still control our blood sugars. 


Some of the recommendations may not be too palatable to some of us. Using olive oil to cook eggs, in my own experience, results in eggs with an off taste I do not enjoy. I would rather cook eggs in coconut oil or butter, and have eggs with a better taste. I have to eat low-carb long-term, and so I prefer avoiding olive oil when that ruins the taste of a meal. (I use it when cooking my kebabs and my bun-free burgers, though, and couldn’t taste the difference.)


Both phases of the diet allow the use of 6-12 oz of wine daily. I was never a drinker, but a small amount of wine with my low-carb, ketogenic meal has a good bit of appeal to me. (Needless to say, problem drinkers should not try this.)


Some of the carbs Parker suggests adding back in the Low-Carb phase seem a bit impractical for some people. He recommends eating 1/3 of a medium apple or 1/3 of a banana. Which means there is 2/3s of that apple or banana still around, and if you like those fruits you might be tempted to eat the rest. Particularly since a cut-open apple or banana does not improve when you set it aside for the next day’s serving.


It also suggests 1/2 a slice of ordinary whole wheat bread or Ezekial 4:9 bread. This leaves another 1/2 slice lying around, plus you have a whole loaf of bread around somewhere. I find that when I resolve to eat only 1/2 a slice of bread, I eat the whole slice or perhaps two, and then my carb-cravings are triggered and I’m likely to eat a few more slices later on. Which is why I prefer to stick with low-carb bread (Aunt Millie’s Carb Smart, 1 net carb per slice) and to eat it only at the last meal of the day.


Parker also allows 3 Tablespoons (1/4 cup) of cooked brown rice. I own a rice cooker, and it just does not work to cook up such a small amount— so you will have a larger batch of cooked rice on hand. Will you be able to resist eating more? I can’t. And after triggering my carb cravings with the rice I’ll have plenty of cooked rice on hand to have a carb binge on. NOT a sustainable low-carb/keto practice.


Right now I’m pushing my low-carb/keto routine in the direction of the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet. If I go on to the higher carb levels of the second phase, it will probably be only one extra serving of the less problematic carbs, done on one or two days a week, and only on days when my morning blood sugar has been good.


My problem is that for the past few months I have had difficulty getting my desired low-carb food supplies due to vehicle problems. My friends, none low-carbers, offer to go buy me groceries, but none are willing to pick me up and drive me to the store. I had one dear friend bring me a load of things that included 5 or 6 loaves of ordinary white bread, loads of pasta, but very little of what I should be eating. And, with limited food in the house, I ate it.


Which brought my carb cravings roaring back, and when I could get to stores I found myself getting ‘treats’— and then lacking the energy to make myself proper low-carb meals, which lead to more ‘treats,’ and as a result my weight has gone up quite a bit.
SO— I need to get back on my keto/low-carbing life, and I’m using the Ketogenic Mediterranean eating plan to do it. Since it’s hard for me to get the salad veggies I need in my rural area, I’ve cleaned up my Victorio sprouter and started my sprouting seeds so I can have daily sprouted salads. I’m consulting Parker’s book for some fresh ideas on what to eat— I’ve already tried his Easy Tuna plus Pecans yesterday, replacing the nasty-and-sugared Miracle Whip with real mayonnaise (would have used avocado oil mayonnaise but can’t get it.)

You Really Do Have To Eat Low-Carb

One of the constant temptations of the low-carbohydrate, ketogenic way of life is deciding that there is some sort of gimmick out there that will let you eat ‘normal’ high carb junk food and still have the health benefits of low-carb and ketosis.

If you don’t come up with this bad idea on your own, merchants are willing to sell it to you. I’ve seen an ad for powdered MCT oil which claims that if you buy and use their product, you can continue to eat high-carb bread, pasta and fruit and magically somehow still have the same benefits as if you had eaten a healthy low-carb diet.

This is the sad and sorry truth. You cannot outrun a bad diet. You cannot buy a product that will magically undo the effects of a bad diet. You will have to eat healthy for your whole life if you want health benefits for your whole life.

On the bright side, knowing the science about the low-carbohydrate way of life means you don’t have to be trapped in the miserable ‘Hunger Games’ of the unscientific calorie-counting method which fails 90% of the time. We can eat actual tasty food— three meals a day if we like— and not have to suffer through hunger pangs.

But we have to limit our carbs. That means there are foods we just may not eat any more. Maybe because we’d have to eat such a tiny portion of them it’s not worth bothering to do it. Or because it will just cause more carb cravings than you want to deal with. Or you were only eating those nasty bananas because someone told you they were healthy, and it’s and actual relief not to have to eat them any more.

When you have beaten any carb addictions you have, you may decide you like the way you feel on low-carb a lot better than you like the momentary pleasure of having a high-carb food in your mouth. But you have to break those addictions first, by following your low-carb plan until it is your way of life.

NOTE: to learn about the low-carb keto way of life, don’t rely on strangers on the internet who may not have good knowledge. Get a good book, by an author whose name is well known in the low-carb keto community. Since a lot of the current crop of keto influencers started off doing Atkins, and Atkins is ketogenic and low-carb, ‘Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution’ is the book I recommend that you start with. Read it all the way through. Read the chapter with the instructions on how to do the actual diet every day for at least two weeks. Get the rules into your head.

Recipe: Low-Carb Caraway Rye or Whole Einkorn Bread (Bread Machine)

When I still ate carbs, I was a bread lover. I have TWO bread machines even today. I beat the high cost of commercial low-carb or keto bread by making my own.

I found the base recipe in Dana Carpender’s 2002 book, 500 Low-Carb Recipes. There are a lot of bread machine recipes, and my favorite is the Rye Bread recipe on page 128.

It calls for a bread machine that makes a 1 pound loaf. My second bread machine only makes 1 1/2 pound or two pound loaves. So I have adapted the recipe to larger loaves. I cut the loaves with my good bread knife when cool, and pack most into 1/2 loaf packages in the freezer.

Caraway rye uses whole rye flour, and tastes like regular rye bread. Einkorn is a more primitive and less addictive form of wheat, available in whole grain or white varieties– we use whole grain here.

All of the bread machine recipes in Carpender’s book call for vital wheat gluten. As you can guess from the name, it is not gluten free and has wheat in it. This ingredient is essential to getting your bread to rise. I buy ‘Anthony’s’ brand. Vital wheat gluten is sometimes sold under other names, like wheat gluten or high-gluten flour. This last name can also mean regular flour with some vital wheat gluten added. The stuff we want has 4 to 6 grams carbs per 1/4 cup or 39 gram serving. Check your label!

Caraway Rye or Whole Einkorn Bread Machine Bread.

Amounts given for 1 1/2 pound loaf, 1 pound or 2 pound in brackets.

1 1/2 cup [1 cup, 2 cups] warm water.

3/4 cup [1/2 cup, 1 cup] wheat bran.

3/4 cup [1/2 cup, 1 cup] rye flour or whole einkorn flour.

1/4 + 1/8 cup [1/4 cup, 1/2 cup] whey protein powder.

1 1/2 teaspoon [1 teaspoon, 2 teaspoons] sea salt.

1 1/2 Tablespoon [1 Tablespoon, 2 Tablespoons] butter or coconut oil.

1 1/2 Tablespoon [1 Tablespoon, 2 Tablespoons] caraway seed for rye bread, omit for Whole Einkorn.

2 1/4 teaspoon [1 1/2 teaspoon, 1 Tablespoon] bread making yeast.

Save yourself trouble- copy out the ingredients for the size on loaf you want onto a scrap of paper.

1. Put in the paddle! Spray the loaf pan with olive oil spray.

2. Put the ingredients in the pan in the order given.

3. Set the machine to French bread or Whole Wheat bread settings, and input the size of loaf you are making. When your settings are all correct, press the start button.

4. If your machine beeps at you at the right time to remove the paddle, remove the paddle at that time. Otherwise, remove it before the baking starts. Or not.

5. When the loaf is done, pull out the loaf pan with oven mitts, and place it somewhere your cats can’t get to it to cool.

6. When bread is cool, slice it. A 1 pound loaf should have 12 slices, bigger loaves should have more. A one slice serving should have about 4.8 grams of net carbs. If your slices came out thick, you may need to use 1/2 slice as one serving.

7. I pack the bread into freezer bags, 1/2 loaf per bag, and thaw as I run out of unfrozen bread.

I currently have both my bread machine running, each making a 1 and 1/2 pound loaf. Often I make rye in one bread maker and whole einkorn in the other.

The carbs in low-carb bread count! Ration your consumption. Make open-face sandwiches to save a slice. And if you fear you might be gluten intolerant, try egg-based bread substitutes from time to time.

Have you ever made low-carb bread in a bread machine? Or are you considering trying it? Please share in a comment your experiences or your questions.

We count Carbs, not Calories

On any good low-carb/keto eating plan, this is the rule: we restrict carbohydrate grams, not calories! If you have a choice between eating a hundred -calorie pack of a high carb food and 400 calories of zero-carb steak, our eating plan says eat the steak.

Some detractors of our way-of-eating claim that Atkins, low-carb and keto only cause weight loss in people who also cut calories. From a scientific perspective, these people are wrong.

A scientific study by Kekwick and Pawan compared three 1000 calorie diets. One was mostly carbohydrates, one mostly protein and one mostly fat. If the common beliefs about calories were true, we would have expected all three groups to have the same outcomes.

But that is not what happened. The carbohydrate diet did not produce weight loss. The protein diet did, and the fat version had even better results.

This study shows that in the body, not all calories are treated in the same way. Which is a big ‘fail’ for the calorie theory.

But some people persist and try to mingle the two approaches. Which is likely to leave you hungry, malnourished and miserable.

Think about a typical ‘dieting’ day. You’re hungry, and you only have about 100 calories left. So you eat one of those 100 calorie packs of high-carb food, you get hungry again very shortly, and you have to hope a magic dose of willpower kicks in so you won’t eat again until morning.

The same situation on low-carb/keto: you are hungry, you’ve eaten all your carbs for the day— and so you have yourself a nice zero-carb steak. Maybe that’s 300 calories, maybe 400, but you don’t have to care about that. You don’t count calories, you count carbs. And the carbs are zero.

Many, many people have lost weight with low-carb eating more calories than one would dare to consume on a calorie-counting diet. Others do eat less on keto, but that’s because being in ketosis makes you unhungry.

So don’t believe it when they say low-carb only works when you are counting calories as well. The science backs up low-carb, and the idea that on low-carb you can actually eat food when you get hungry. It’s not a semi-starvation plan.

Recipe: Triple Threat Keto Baked Chicken Thighs

Chicken thighs are a favorite of mine. They are much cheaper than chicken wings, and are meatier and not as nasty-dry as chicken breasts can be.

I buy bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs, and I drain off the schmaltz — chicken fat— after baking, and freeze the bones to make bone broth.

Triple Threat Keto Baked Chicken Thighs

2 chicken thighs for each serving

Get out a baking pan with a rim to hold the melted fat, big enough for the amount of chicken you are making. Spray it lightly with olive oil pan spray, or grease it lightly with any healthy fat to prevent sticking.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Place the chicken in the pan upside down, and bake for 20 minutes.

Take pan out– it is hot! — and flip the chicken pieces over. Bake for 40 minutes more.

Remove chicken from plate. Pour off schmaltz into canning jar from pan, filtering through a coffee filter or a non-gauze milk filter from the feed mill.

When you eat the chicken, salt to taste, and add a bit of nutmeg or paprika, or a bit of soy sauce or coconut aminos. We don’t add this stuff before baking, so it doesn’t affect the schmaltz. When I eat it, I remove the skin first, and save it to eat last, as dessert.

When you finish eating, get out a gallon-size freezer bag. Write ‘chicken bones’ and the date on it. Put the bones in, put it in the freezer, and put in future chicken bones as well until the bag is full and you can make bone broth.

Variations: If you use frozen chicken, take it out of the freezer the night before and store in the fridge.

Use other chicken parts– you may be able to get whole chickens at a good price. Or you may be able to get pastured poultry, or butcher your own young hens. (Stewing hens need cooking in a crock-pot.)

You may also use a warm home-made sauce to flavor your chicken. I rarely bother– I think the baked chicken is wonderful with just salt.

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Recipe: Bulletproof Bone Broth

Bulletproof coffee is a thing. I even started drinking coffee over it, because I didn’t want to put stuff in my tea.

But I’ve been reading up on the carnivore way-of-eating lately, and some of the books discourage coffee. What to do? A good alternative is bulletproof bone broth.

There are many recipes for bone broth out there. Most involve cooking the bones in a crock-pot for up to 48 hours to get all the bonely goodness out. I’ve made bone broth from beef, pork, and leftover chicken bones. It’s all good.

Bulletproof Bone Broth or Broth

1 cup or more bone broth (or 3/4 cup bone broth and 1/4 cup water) or ordinary broth

1-2 Tablespoons fat- tallow, bacon fat, lard, schmaltz, butter or ghee, extra-virgin olive oil, coconut oil or MCT oil for the plant-eaters.

Optional – 1 -2 Tablespoons heavy whipping cream, unwhipped. May substitute coconut milk or cream.

1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon sea salt or Himalayan pink salt. (Omit if you really have to.)

Optional– herbs or spices for flavoring.

Put the ingredients in a saucepan. Put it on a stove burner set to low for at least five minutes or until any solid fats melt. Stir a little if you like.

When time is up, pour the broth into a mug. You may need to wait a couple of minutes for it to cool to drinkable temperature.

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Why Original Atkins is Best

I’ve been doing the low-carb thing for over 20 years now. It started when I bought the original Dr Atkins Diet Revolution in a thrift shop. I had heard bad things about Atkins, but I was desperate to lose some weight, and figured I could just quit when I became thinner.

I never did quit. My goals changed when I saw low-carb/keto helped with health problems. I managed to accumulate many other Atkins books, as well as others about our way-of-eating.

I liked the original Atkins the best. In the time when that book was written, few folks had access to specialty grocery stores and specialty foods. Atkins knew most followers would be limited to the foods they could get in a regular grocery. Big city people don’t realize it, but many people have similar limitations even today.

Original Atkins was also free of the Atkins corporation which had not been started yet. Later Atkins books feature recipes calling for Atkins brand ingredients, some of which are no longer made, others which are not available in all areas.

I am troubled how the current Atkins products brag about their low ‘sugar carbs’ on their labels. We don’t count ‘sugar carbs’ on Original Atkins but carbs. They also talk about their protein content and never mention fat. Well, a corporation is a life form that lives to sell product. We can’t expect it to do anything that would hurt sales.

Another difference is that Later Atkins has you counting ‘net carbs.’ This tends to reward people for eating high fiber foods. In Original Atkins you just counted carbs, and so you couldn’t exactly chomp down two heads of lettuce at a meal, or use a high fiber ‘low-carb baking mix’ that can cause painful constipation.

Original Atkins is not perfect. Aimed at weight loss only, it has multiple levels that by the time you hit Maintainance, have you out of ketosis altogether. Not good if you need ketosis to help you deal with your arthritis, diabetes, autism spectrum disorder or depression on an ongoing basis.

The solution to that is to be smart. Don’t get caught up in a cycle of going up levels to add back more carbs, and lose the benefits of being in ketosis.

As you learn more about low-carb/keto, you may tweak your practice to incorporate your new knowledge. I no longer use canola oil, for example. And I’ve learned to enjoy some zero-carb foods, like pork chops, that I never used to like. I’m also crazy for chicken thighs, because they are cheaper than wings, taste great, and I can make bone broth from the bones.